Browse Tag: how to

How to Build a Raspberry Pi TorrentBox

If you already use your Raspberry Pi as a server then you’ll want to add some torrent capabilities to it. Even if you are not using your Raspberry Pi as a server you can turn your Raspberry Pi into a torrent box using a very popular torrent program called Transmission. You may have heard of Transmission before, it comes pre-installed on many popular Debian based Linux distro’s.

Transmission is usually a standalone program you can use to manage your torrents but today I will be showing your how to install Transmission on your Raspberry Pi and run and manage your torrents from your browser. This is beneficial because you can download torrents from anywhere in your house and connect your Raspberry Pi to a Network Attached Storage and store your files there. If you have a VPN at home you can even connect to your network and tell your Raspberry Pi TorrentBox what to download.

I currently have my Raspberry Pi running a network wide adblocker, Kodi, and a Raspberry Pi VPN and found that it can handle running a torrent client like Transmission with ease. Transmission really doesn’t take up to much process power and the Raspberry Pi runs the web GUI with ease.

Objective

To install a torrent client onto our Raspberry Pi and turn our Raspberry Pi into a TorrentBox

Material

You will need the following:

Instructions

I will assume you are running Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi. You can also follow this tutorial for any Debian based Linux distro. I have Rasbian Jessie Lite installed on my Raspberry Pi and will be connecting to my Pi over SSH to install Transmission.

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How to Setup a Raspberry Pi Plex Server

In this tutorial I will be showing how to turn your Raspberry Pi into a Plex Media Server. Plex is a Client/Software media player which organizes all your TV Shows, Movies, and Music and allows you play them on any of your devices. The Plex Server will store all your media and will transmit the media to your client, which can be your Phone, TV, Tablet, XBox, Chromecast or even your Raspberry Pi running RasPlex, the possibilities are endless since the Plex Client is available for almost every device. You can also setup your Raspberry Pi Plex Server to allow you to take your media anywhere by setting it up to be available outside of your network.

The Plex Media Server will also trans-code your media on the fly so that you can play any media file on any device, even if the client device doesn’t support the media file. This is why I recommend loading the Plex Server on the Raspberry Pi 3, it will work on the Raspberry Pi 2 as well. The Raspberry Pi 3 will work the best since it has the fastest processor, I would not recommend running the Plex Server on the original Raspberry Pi.

Objective

To install the Plex Media Server on our Raspberry Pi 3

Material

You will need the following:

Instructions

I will be installing the Raspberry Pi Plex Server remotely to my Raspberry Pi over SSH. I will be running my Raspberry Pi as a server without a monitor which will allow me to control it from any other computer over SSH. I will assume you know how to SSH into your Raspberry Pi server.

Install the Raspberry Pi Plex Server

SSH into your Raspberry Pi and run the apt-get update and upgrade commands to get our Raspberry Pi software up to date before we start installing our Plex Server. Run the following commands: Continue Reading

How to Perform a Quiet Boot on the Raspberry Pi

If you plan on using your Raspberry Pi as a Retro gaming station or are using it in a setting where you want to remove the boot text from being displayed on the Raspberry Pi then you need to make your Raspberry Pi perform a quiet boot. A quiet boot will remove the rows of text that are displayed during a boot (also called verbose boot) and can be replaced with a logo. This can come in handy if you are making your own arcade machine or a commercial product with the Raspberry Pi.

Objective

To perform a quiet boot on the Raspberry Pi and remove the boot text

Material

You will need the following:

Instructions

Performing a quiet boot on your Raspberry Pi is very easy and it will only take us a view steps. I wrote these instructions on the official Raspbian Jessie distro but if you are running any other Raspberry Pi distro it should work the same way. Continue Reading

How to Setup a Raspberry Pi SFTP Server

SFTP stands for SSH File Transfer Protocol and is a secure way of remotely transferring files between 2 computers. It is a more preferred way of transferring files over the standard FTP protocol because it uses a secure connection meaning all your data is encrypted. FTP is an insecure way of transferring files and can easily be monitored over your network to intercept and see what files are being transferred, like secure bank information.

SFTP runs on port 22, the same standard port as a regular SSH connection, and FTP runs on port 21. It is advised that you change your SSH Port to improve security on your network. You can also port forward port 22 on your router to allow access to your Raspberry Pi server over SFTP from anywhere outside your network, but make sure you change your SSH port if you will be doing this to reduce the amount of attempted hacks on your Raspberry Pi SFTP server.

Today I will be showing you how to setup a Raspberry Pi SFTP server so that you can easily access files on your Raspberry Pi. This can be very useful if you are using your Raspberry Pi as a Network Attached Storage device or simply as a web server. Transferring files over SFTP will allow you to quickly download or upload multiple files with no issues and make changes to your web server on the go.

Objective

To setup our Raspberry Pi as a SFTP Server

Material

You will need the following:

Instructions

Setting up your Raspberry Pi SFTP is very easy and all we need to do is basically enable the SSH server on our Raspberry Pi because our SFTP server will be transferring files over SSH. Open a new terminal window on Raspbian desktop and type the following command to open the Raspberry Pi config tool. Continue Reading

How to Build a Raspberry Pi Security Surveillance Camera with MotionEye

Turning your Raspberry Pi into a security surveillance camera is a cheap alternative to setting up a security system in your house or office. The Raspberry Pi 3 is more then powerful to capture video with the Official Raspberry Pi camera. Today we will be installing MotionEye on our Raspberry Pi to turn it into a security camera. We will be able to view live video in our browser as well as auto record videos when motion is detected. This is great for saving precious space on our microSD card and only keeping the videos we need. We can also save the videos and delete them after a set amount of time. Setting up a Raspberry Pi security camera with MotionEye is very easy and works right out of the box with the default settings.

We will also be able to setup a network of security cameras with multiple Raspberry Pi’s and monitor all of camera over one interface. If cost and space is an issue it is possible to upload all our videos to your Dropbox or Google Drive account for easy access anywhere. This is a great low cost solution to building a security system in your house and you can also use it as an outdoor system as well to monitor your front door. There are a ton of Raspberry Pi compatible cameras you can use for the Raspberry Pi security camera and the choice is your’s depending on your needs. You can use the official Raspberry Pi camera that plugs into the camera port or you can use an old webcam that you have laying around and plug it into the USB port.

Objective

To build a Raspberry Pi security surveillance camera system that is run and controlled over your own network

Material

You will need the following:

Instructions

Let’s get started. We will first need to install our camera onto the Raspberry Pi by plugging it into the camera port. I am using the official NOIR Raspberry Pi camera in this tutorial, however you can use whatever camera is compatible with the Raspberry Pi. Plug your camera’s ribbon cable into the camera ribbon slot on the Raspberry Pi board, the camera ribbon port is the one located behind the Ethernet port. You your fingers to pull up on both sides of the connector to open it up and insert the ribbon cable with the metal leads facing away from the Ethernet port. Once the ribbon cable is seated all the way inside the connector you can push down on the connector to lock the camera’s ribbon cable in place. It is important that the metal leads face away from the Ethernet port or your camera may not work or even worse it can be shorted. Continue Reading

How to backup the Raspberry Pi SD Card using Linux

Let’s face it, your hard drive will eventually fail and so will any storage device you own, especially something small like your Raspberry Pi SD card which not only can become corrupted but also lost if you use it outside your home transferring files at different locations. I am a big advocate of creating backups of your Raspberry Pi’s SD Card and create an image of the SD card that you can store on Google Drive or Dropbox.

I recently was using my Raspberry Pi as a server and had a ton of data and hours of software configurations that I have been using my Raspberry Pi for and during a thunderstorm the power got cut out, when power was restored and I booted up my server everything was corrupted and all my data was lost. If I had only created an image I would be able to insert a new SD card into my computer and restore my previously saved image and be back in business in 5 minutes.

Since all my computers in the house are running Linux I will be showing you how to create a backup image of your Raspberry Pi’s SD card and restoring your image back onto the SD card. The distro of Linux I am running is Linux Mint, which is a Debian Linux flavor. The steps for creating your Raspberry Pi image on Linux will work on all distributions of Linux since the command I will be using is a standard Linux command.

Objective

To create a backup image of the Raspberry Pi SD Card

Material

You will need the following:

Instructions for Backing up the Raspberry Pi SD Card

Lets start off by opening a terminal window on your Linux computer. We will be able to do everything through the terminal window. Don’t put in your Raspberry Pi’s SD card into your computer yet, before putting in the SD card run the following command to display the amount of disk space available on our system. We really don’t care about the available disk space, what we will be looking for is all the partitions on our hard drive and we will be making note of what new partitions show up when we insert our Raspberry Pi SD card. Run the following command: Continue Reading