Browse Tag: ssh port number

3 steps to take to improve the security of your Raspberry Pi server

About: The latest version of Raspbian disables SSH by default to improve security of the Raspberry Pi. This is a great step of improving internet and network security and I congratulate the Raspberry Pi team for moving forward with this step and making it super easy to enable SSH by simply adding a file called “ssh” into the /boot/ directory.

Enabling SSH allows you to use your Raspberry Pi headless, meaning you can use it without a keyboard and monitor by connecting to it from another computer. The problem with enabling SSH on your Raspberry Pi server is that if you expose your server to the internet you will notice many hackers will attempt to connect to your server and try to access it using brute-force attacks.

I will shows you 3 things you can do to improve the security of your Raspberry Pi server today if you have SSH enabled. These steps will improve your Raspberry Pi’s security as well as your personal network. We will learn how to change the default SSH port number, install Fail2Ban to ban IP addresses if they attempt to brute-force our user passwords and finally I will show you how to create SSH keys so that only the computer you create a key for will be able to access your Raspberry Pi server.

Objective: To improve security on the Raspberry Pi by changing the SSH Port Number, Installig Fail2Ban and generating SSH keys

Material: You will need the following:

  • Raspberry Pi (Click the link to check out the price on Amazon. Usually around $37 with free shipping)

Continue Reading

How to change your SSH Port on the Raspberry Pi

About: The latest version of Raspbian disables SSH by default to improve security of the Raspberry Pi. This is a great step of improving internet and network security and I congratulate the Raspberry Pi team for moving forward with this step and making it super easy to enable SSH by simply adding a file called “ssh” into the /boot/ directory.

Enabling SSH allows you to use your Raspberry Pi headless, meaning you can use it without a keyboard and monitor by connecting to it from another computer. The problem still persists that if you have SSH enabled on port 22 hackers can still scan your network looking for an open port 22. They can then attempt to enter your network from the Raspberry Pi and attempt to brute force your username and password.

Changing your SSH port will increase your security assuming a hacker scans your network for default ports only. You will still need to have a secure password and think of using SSH keys to improve security even further. Changing your port number will simply decrease the amount of probe attempts on your port. A non-standard port means that you don’t automatically show up in Shodan or other places that list machines listening on port 22.

Objective: To change our default SSH port number from 22 to another random port number to increase security

Material: You will need the following:

  • Raspberry Pi (Click the link to check out the price on Amazon. Usually around $37 with free shipping)

Instructions: Let’s start off by opening the terminal on your Raspberry Pi or by connecting to it over SSH

Continue Reading