Browse Tag: WiFi

How to get the PSK or Password of a WiFi network if you have the WPS Pin

About: I have previously discussed how easily a router that has WPS enabled can be hacked. You can check out my post on how to perform a Pixie Dust Attack and attempt to grab a WPS pin from a unsecured router.  The attack takes a matter of seconds not days and will expose your WiFi password. It doesn’t matter if you are using WPA or WPA2 security since the WPS pin completely bypasses this security. Since you already have the WPS Pin you should be able to connect to the users SSID but you will not know their network password. The method I will show you today will expose their SSID password. If you have their SSID password, they may be using the same password for Facebook or Google or any other website.

A little knowledge about WPS. WPS stands for Wi-Fi Protected Setup and it is a wireless networking standard that tries to make connections between a router and your wireless devices faster and easier. It only works for wireless networks that have WPA/WPA2 security. It is suppose to make it easier to connect devices without a keyboard, like a TV, to your home network. Most routers come with WPS enabled and work by pushing the WPS button on your router and connecting your device. I personally have never heard or WPS before doing this research and have never used it in my personal life.

Objective: To demonstrate how to retrieve the PSK (password) of a WiFi network if you have the WPS Pin

Material: You will need the following:

  • Raspberry Pi (I have PwnPi 3.0 running on mine)
  • USB WiFi Adapter – I used the Panda USB WiFi adapter in this tutorial
  • PwnPi or Kali Linux distro on your Raspberry Pi or Linux machine
  • WPS Pin for the Network you are attempting to steal the PSK (Password)

Instructions: I am using PwnPi distro on my Raspberry Pi which has the tools I will need to get the PSK of the victims WiFi. You will pretty much need ‘WPA_Supplicant’ and ‘WPA Cli’ installed on your distro to expose the PSK so using PwnPi or Kali isn’t really necessary if you want to install those packages separately.
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How to connect your Raspberry Pi 3 to a WiFi network using the terminal

About: I recently purchased a Raspberry Pi 3 and was excited to learn that it comes with Bluetooth and WiFi built-in. Since I will be using this Raspberry Pi as a server I will be running it headless so it will not have a monitor. I will connect to the Raspberry Pi over SSH. The Raspberry Pi I will be using is running Raspbian Lite but will also work on the GUI version of Raspbian.

Objective: To connect your headless Raspberry Pi 3 to your WiFi network.

Material: You will need the following:

  • Raspberry Pi (Click the link to check out the price on Amazon. Usually around $36 with free shipping)

Instructions: Go ahead and connect to the Raspberry Pi over SSH and login to the Raspberry Pi. The default username and password is ‘pi’ and ‘raspberry’.  Continue Reading

How to setup your Raspberry Pi as an Access Point

About: Setting up your Raspberry Pi as an access point may come in handy. Especially in a pinch when your home router dies and you need some WiFi in your house while a new router is on order. It can also be useful if you want to set up an access point to perform evil doings like monitoring all the traffic or setting up an evil twin network.

In this tutorial we will be setting up a WiFi Access Point and linking all data to our Ethernet connection, so make sure we have an active internet connection on the Ethernet port to tunnel all the WiFi data to it.

Objective: To create a WiFi access point on our Raspberry Pi and link our WiFi connection to the Ethernet connection.

Material: You will need the following:

Instructions: Just a warning before continuing, setting up your network settings can mess things up if you are using the Raspberry Pi for something else. Be sure to make a backup of your Raspberry Pi before continuing if you need to. Also troubleshooting network issues can be difficult if you are inexperienced with networking. Be sure to follow the directions carefully and you should be alright.

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Cracking WEP WiFi using the Raspberry Pi

About: WEP WiFi security has been debunked for years but thankfully for us there are still people who have never switched to the more secure WPA2 protocol. These are either older businesses who never invested in updating their security or have older equipment which is not compatible with the WPA2 security protocol. You will see how unsecured the WEP protocol is and how quickly it can be cracked. The Raspberry Pi I will be using is overclocked to 900 MHz so it will speed up the cracking process a little bit. I plan on writing a separate article on how the different overclock settings and how they compare.

Objective: To demonstrate how insecure the WEP security protocol is and how easily it can be cracked.

Material: You will need the following:

Instructions: In this tutorial I will be cracking my own WiFi router. I have set it up to WEP protocol and have a few phones connected to my network. If you will be doing this you will need to make sure that there is something connected to your network so that there is information being passed back and forth. We will be monitoring all the data and storing it to a file which we will be cracking afterwards. The more data we collect the better our success rate will be. I will also show you how to speed this process up by requesting data from the WiFi router without connecting to it. Continue Reading